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House to Consider Appropriations Bills Next Week

In advance of Floor consideration, the House Appropriations Committee today released summaries of seven Appropriations bills expected to be considered in the House next week.

The seven bills are Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies; Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies; Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies; Financial Services and General Government; Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies; Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies; and Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies.

“After the devastation of the pandemic and decades of disinvestment, the American economy caters increasingly to the wealthy and leaves the middle class, hard-working families, small businesses, and the vulnerable behind,” Appropriations Committee Chair Rosa DeLauro (D-CT-03) said. “With these bills, we are reversing these trends and investing in the American people. Together, our transformative and historic funding increases will create good-paying jobs, grow opportunity for the middle class and small businesses and provide a lifeline for working families and the vulnerable.”

Bill text and Committee reports are available here. Information on additional Committee-reported bills will be released in the coming days.

Table of Contents

Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies
Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies
Financial Services and General Government
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies
Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies
Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies

Bill Text | Committee Report

The 2022 Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies funding bill provides $253.8 billion, an increase of $55.2 billion – 28 percent – above 2021. With this historic increase, the legislation:

  • Creates and sustains good-paying American jobs through investments in job training, apprenticeship programs, and worker protection
  • Grows opportunity with transformative investments in education, including record funding for high-poverty schools and students with disabilities, and strong increases for programs that expand access to post-secondary education
  • Supports middle class and working families with increased funding for child care and development programs, Head Start, and preschool development grants
  • Strengthens lifesaving biomedical research with increased funding for the National Institutes of Health, including funding to establish the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health
  • Bolsters our public health infrastructure with more resources for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and for states and local governments to strengthen infrastructure and capacity
  • Addresses our nation’s most urgent health crises, including maternal health, mental health, gun violence, and substance misuse, while making strides to reduce persistent and unacceptable health disparities
  • Advances equal treatment for women by increasing funding for the range of health services, including family planning, covered by Title X and repealing the discriminatory Hyde Amendment

Summary:

Department of Labor (DOL) The bill provides a total of $14.7 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOL, an increase of $2.2 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $400 million above the President’s budget request.  Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $11.6 billion for the Employment and Training Administration, an increase of $1.6 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $371.2 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $3.1 billion for Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act State Grants, an increase of $250 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $76.2 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $96.7 million for Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers, an increase of $2.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $150 million for the Reintegration of Ex-Offenders, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $285 million for Registered Apprenticeships, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $145 million for YouthBuild, an increase of $48.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $100 million, an increase of $55 million over the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request, to continue and expand Strengthening Community College Training Grants to help meet local and regional labor market demand for a skilled workforce by providing training to workers in in-demand industries at community colleges and four-year partners.
    • $100 million to support communities experiencing dislocations related to fossil fuel and energy production.
    • $50 million for National Youth Employment Program to support summer and year-round employment for youth.
    • $20 million for Veterans Clean Energy Training to prepare veterans and their spouses for employment in clean energy.
    • $1.83 billion for Job Corps, an increase of $81.4 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $75.3 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $450 million for the Senior Community Service Employment for Older Americans Program, an increase of $45 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
    • $3.1 billion for operation of the Unemployment Insurance program, an increase of $559.4 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request. The bill also includes contingency funding to help States if there is a spike in unemployment claims.
    • $94.1 million for Foreign Labor Certification, an increase of $16.3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $4.5 million above the President’s budget request. Funds will help support Federal oversight and enforcement of regulations and assist States in reviewing and conducting oversight of processing applications.
  • $2.1 billion for Worker Protection Agencies, an increase of $305 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $1 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $300 million for the Wage and Hour Division, an increase of $54 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $24 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $692 million for the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $27 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $141 million for the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • $218 million for the Employee Benefits Security Administration, an increase of $38 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
  • $136 million for the Bureau of International Labor Affairs, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $12 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $25 million for the Women’s Bureau, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $5 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $68 million for the Homeless Veterans Reintegration Program, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) – The bill provides a total of $119.8 billion for HHS, an increase of $22.9 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $129 million below the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • National Institutes of Health (NIH) – The bill provides a total of $49 billion for NIH, an increase of $6.5 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • The bill includes $3 billion to establish the Advanced Research Projects Agency for Health (ARPA-H) to accelerate the pace of scientific breakthroughs for diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cancer.
    • The bill also includes an increase of $3.5 billion for existing NIH Institutes and Centers, which supports an increase of no less than 5 percent for each Institute and Center to support a wide range of biomedical and behavioral research, as well as targeted investments in several high-priority areas, including:
      • $7 billion, an increase of $432 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the National Cancer Institute, including $194 million for the Cancer Moonshot;
      • $541 million, an increase of $41 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the All of Us Precision Medicine Initiative;
      • $612 million, an increase of $52 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the BRAIN Initiative;
      • An increase of $627 million for research related to opioids, stimulants, and pain/pain management;
      • An increase of $330 million for health disparities research;
      • An increase of $30 million for the Implementing a Maternal Health and Pregnancy Outcomes Vision for Everyone (IMPROVE) initiative, to support research on maternal morbidity and mortality;
      • $25 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for firearm injury and mortality prevention research;
      • $250 million, an increase of $30 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Universal Flu Vaccine Research;
      • $3.3 billion, an increase of $200 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for HIV/AIDS research, including an increase of $10 million for the Centers for AIDS Research as part of the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative;
      • $3.4 billion, an increase of $200 million above the FY 2021 enacted level for Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias research;
      • $110 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for research on the impacts of climate change on human health;
      • $80 million, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the INCLUDE Down syndrome research initiative;
      • $61 million, an increase of $18 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Office of Research on Women’s Health;
      • $50 million, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research;
      • Increased investments in increasing diversity in the biomedical research workforce, including $88 million, an increase of $8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Research Centers in Minority Institutions, an increase of $20 million for research workforce programs, and an increase of $16 million to strengthen the Office of the CIO for Scientific Workforce Diversity;
      • $616 million, an increase of $29 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Clinical and Translational Science Awards;
      • $415 million, an increase of $18 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Institutional Development Awards;
      • An increase of $40 million for targeted research related to the impact of COVID-19 on children and on mental health;
      • $50 million to support rapid vaccine development platforms for emerging infectious diseases;
      • $12 million, an increase of $6 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Consortium of Food Allergy Research; and
      • An increase of $100 million to strengthen cybersecurity at NIH.
         
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) – The bill includes a total of $10.6 billion for CDC, an increase of $2.7 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $1 billion above the President’s budget request. This includes $903 million in transfers from the Prevention and Public Health Fund.
     
  • The bill includes significant investments in our nation’s public health infrastructure including:
    • $1 billion in a new, flexible funding stream for public health infrastructure and capacity nationwide.
    • $150 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to modernize public health data surveillance and analytics at CDC and State and local health departments.
    • $106 million, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, in public health workforce initiatives.
    • $843 million, an increase of $250 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for global health.
    • $190 million, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the National Center for Health Statistics.
    • $715 million, an increase of $20 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for public health emergency preparedness cooperative agreements.
       
  • The bill provides increases for numerous public health efforts, including:
    • $25 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for firearm injury and mortality prevention research.
    • $74 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the only Federal program addressing the nation’s racial and ethnic health disparities, Racial and Ethnic Approach to Community Health (REACH), including $27 million, an increase of $5 million, for Good Health and Wellness in Indian Country.
    • $119 million, an increase $56 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for safe motherhood.
    • $110 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the health impacts of climate change.
    • $153 million, an increase of $150 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for social determinates of health.
    • $275 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Ending the HIV Initiative.
    • $115 million, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for community and youth violence prevention.
    • $663 million, an increase of $188 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for opioid overdose prevention and surveillance.
    • $75 million, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, for food safety.
    • $250 million, an increase of $12.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to address tobacco and e-cigarettes.
       
  • Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) – The bill funds SAMHSA at $9.16 billion – an increase of $3.14 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level. SAMHSA funding includes:
    • Mental Health: $3.16 billion, an increase of $1.36 billion over the FY 2021 enacted level, including an $825 million increase to the Mental Health Block Grant (MHBG), making investments across the behavioral health continuum to support prevention, screening, treatment, and other services.
    • Mental health resources for children and youth: $155 million for Project AWARE, an increase of $48.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; $100 million for the National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative, an increase of $28 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; $25 million for Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health, an increase of $17 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; and $150 million for the Children’s Mental Health program, an increase of $25 million over the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • Suicide prevention: $26.2 million for the Zero Suicide program, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; and $113.6 million for the Suicide Lifeline, an increase of $89.6 million above the FY 2021 enacted level to support the implementation of the Lifeline’s new 988 number.
    • Increases the mental health crisis systems set-aside in the MHBG to 10 percent.
    • Creates a new 10 percent set-aside within the MHBG to support prevention and early intervention.
    • Creates a new Mental Health Crisis Response Partnership Pilot Program, which will provide $100 million to help communities create mobile crisis response teams.
    • Substance use treatment: $5.5 billion, an increase of $1.6 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level, including continued funding for opioid prevention and treatment, recovery, and tribal-focused treatment efforts. This includes $2.8 billion, an increase of $1 billion over the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant (SABG); $2 billion for State Opioid Response Grants, an increase of $500 million over the FY 2021 enacted level; and $136.5 million, an increase of $56.5 million, for Medication Assisted Treatment.
    • Creates a new 10 percent set-aside within the SABG to support recovery services.
    • Substance abuse prevention: $243.5 million, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
       
  • Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) – The bill includes $7.5 billion for HRSA, an increase of $1.6 billion above the 2021 enacted level and $910 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
    • $1.8 billion, an increase of $148 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Health Centers program, including $50 million, an increase of $45 million, to support school-based health centers, and $25 million to establish the Alcee Hastings Cancer Screening Program;
    • $2.7 billion, an increase of $231 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program;
    • $152 million, an increase of $50 million, in Health Centers and $190 million, an increase of $85 million, in the Ryan White HIV/AIDS program for the Ending the HIV Epidemic Initiative;
    • $1.6 billion, an increase of $341 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for HRSA’s Bureau of Health Professions programs to support health workforce development;
    • $1.2 billion, an increase of $214 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for programs to improve maternal and child health, including:
      • $869 million, an increase of $156 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Maternal and Child Health Block Grant;
      • $14 million, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Alliance for Maternal Health Safety Bundles;
      • $53 million, an increase of $30 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for State Maternal Health Innovation Grants;
      • $5 million, an increase of $2 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Maternal Mental Health Hotline;
      • $25 million in new funding for the Pregnancy Medical Home Demonstration; and
      • $10 million, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Screening and Treatment for Maternal Depression and Related Disorders.
    • $400 million, an increase of $214 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Rural Health Programs, including $79 million, an increase of $23 million, to support rural hospitals and $10 million, an increase of $5 million for the Rural Maternity and Obstetrics Management Strategies (RMOMS) program; and
    • $400 million, an increase of $113.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $60 million above the President’s budget request, for the Title X Family Planning program.
       
  • Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) – The bill provides $380 million for AHRQ, an increase of $42 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
     
  • Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) – The bill provides $4.3 billion for CMS administrative expenses, an increase of $646 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This funding level includes an increase of $74.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level for State Survey and Certification activities to strengthen improvement efforts, increase health and safety inspections of nursing home facilities, and ensure that long-term care and other facilities have proper infection controls in place.
     
  • Administration for Children and Families (ACF) – The bill provides $31.3 billion in discretionary funding for ACF, an increase of $6.6 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $680 million above the President’s budget request.
    • Early childhood education programs receive an increase of $3.1 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level:
      • $7.4 billion for the Child Care and Development Block Grant, an increase of $1.5 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level;
      • $12.2 billion for Head Start, an increase of $1.4 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level; and
      • $450 million for Preschool Development Grants, an increase of $175 million above the FY 2021 enacted level. 
    • $3.9 billion for the Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, an increase of $150 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $800 million for the Community Services Block Grant, an increase of $55 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $257 million for Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act (CAPTA) programs, an increase of $71 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $463 million for Family Violence and Prevention Services Act (FVPSA) programs, an increase of $281 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $26 million for the Domestic Violence Hotline, an increase of $13 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
       
  • Administration for Community Living (ACL) – The bill funds ACL at $3.1 billion, an increase of $846 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $96 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
    • $1.4 billion for Senior Nutrition programs, an increase of $436 million above the FY 2021 enacted level;
    • $551 million for Home and Community-based Supportive Services, an increase of $158 million above the FY 2021 enacted level;
    • $266 million for Family and Native American Caregivers Services, an increase of $66 million above the FY 2021 enacted level;
    • $70 million for Grants for Native Americans, an increase of $35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; and
    • $14.2 million for the Lifespan Respite Program, an increase of $7.1 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
       
  • Office of the Secretary—General Departmental Management – The bill provides $658 million, an increase of $106 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The amount includes:
    • $130 million for the Teen Pregnancy Prevention program, an increase of $29 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $76 million for the Office of Minority Health, an increase of $14 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $14 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $58 million for the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $3 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $42 million for the Office on Women’s Health, an increase of $7 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $7 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $5 million for KidneyX, equal to the FY 2021 enacted level, for a public-private partnership to accelerate the development and adoption of novel therapies and technologies to improve the diagnosis and treatment of kidney diseases.
    • No funding for abstinence-only education.
       
  • Office of the Secretary—Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund (PHSSEF) – The bill provides $3.5 billion for PHSSEF, an increase of $671 million above the FY 2020 level and $5 million below the President’s budget request.
  • The bill provides funding to improve the nation’s preparedness for public health emergencies, including:
    • $335 million, an increase of $48 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for pandemic influenza.
    • $823 million, an increase of $227 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA).
    • $770 million, equal to the President’s budget request, for Project BioShield.
    • $905 million, an increase of $200 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the Strategic National Stockpile.
    • $240 million, an increase of $8.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Hospital Preparedness Program formula grants.
    • $31 million, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to expand the number of Regional Ebola and Other Special Pathogen Treatment Centers.

Department of Education (ED) – The bill provides a total of $102.8 billion in discretionary appropriations for ED, an increase of $29.3 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • K-12 Education, including Individuals with Disabilities Education Act programs—The bill provides $65.6 billion, an increase of $25 billion over the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill provides:
  • $36 billion for Title I Grants to Local Educational Agencies, an increase of $19.5 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level.
  • $17.2 billion for Special Education, an increase of $3.1 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $7 million above the President’s budget request. The amount includes:
    • $15.5 billion for Part B Grants to States, an increase of $2.6 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request, and
    • $29 million for Special Olympics education programs, an increase of $5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
  • $1 billion for English Language Acquisition, an increase of $203 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $83 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $2.3 billion for Supporting Effective Instruction State Grants (Title II-A), an increase of $150 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $145 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $1.3 billion for Student Support and Academic Enrichment State Grants, an increase of $85 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
  • $1.4 billion for Nita M. Lowey 21st Century Community Learning Centers, an increase of $100 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $50 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Continued support for a Social and Emotional Learning (SEL) Initiative to support SEL and “whole child” approaches to education. Within this amount, the bill provides:
    • $112 million, an increase of $45 million over the FY 2021 enacted level, for grants for evidence-based, field-initiated innovations that address student social, emotional, and cognitive needs within the Education Innovation and Research program;
    • $90 million, an increase of $10 million over the FY21 enacted level, for the Supporting Effective Educator Development (SEED) program with a priority for teacher professional development and pathways into teaching that provide a strong foundation in child development and learning, including skills for implementing SEL strategies;
    • $1 billion within School Safety National Activities for Mental Health Services Professional Demonstration Grants and School-Based Mental Health Services Grants to help LEAs directly increase the number of mental health and child development experts in schools; and
    • $443 million, an increase of $413 million over the FY 2021 enacted level, for Full-Service Community Schools to provide comprehensive services and expand evidence-based models that meet the holistic needs of children, families, and communities.
       
  • Career, Technical and Adult Education—The bill provides $2.2 billion for Career, Technical and Adult Education, an increase of $208 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $55 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
    • $1.38 billion for CTE State Grants, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $30 million above the President’s budget request, and
    • $738.7 million for Adult Education State Grants, an increase of $50 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $25 million above the President’s budget request.
       
  • Student Financial Assistance— The bill provides $27.2 billion for Federal student aid programs, an increase of $2.64 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $358 million below the President’s budget request.  Within this amount, the bill provides:
    • $6,895 for the maximum Pell Grant, an increase of $400 above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s discretionary budget request.
    • $1.03 billion for the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant program, an increase of $148 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
    • $1.43 billion for Federal Work Study, an increase of $244 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
       
  • Higher Education— The bill provides $3.43 billion for higher education programs, an increase of $889 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $122 million above the President’s budget request.
    • Within this amount, the bill provides $1.13 billion, an increase of $345 million over the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request, to assist primarily Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) in the Aid for Institutional Development account, including:
      • $402.6 million for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, an increase of $65 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $236.7 million for Hispanic Serving Institutions, an increase of $88 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget.
      • $53 million for Tribally Controlled Colleges and Universities, an increase of $15 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
    • The bill also provides investments in the following higher education programs:
      • $1.3 billion for Federal TRIO programs, an increase of $200.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $408 million for GEAR UP, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $132 million for Teacher Quality Partnerships, an increase of $80 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $95 million for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School, an increase of $40 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the same as the President’s budget request.
      • $168 million for the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, an increase of $127 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $92 million above the President’s budget request. This amount includes:
        • $15 million to continue the Centers of Excellence for Veteran Student Success Program to provide student veterans a one-stop-shop for academic support, networking opportunities, peer mentorship, financing assistance, counseling, and career services.
        • $12 million to continue the Open Textbook Pilot program to support the creation and expand the sustainable use of quality open college textbooks.
        • $10 million to promote the study of modeling and simulation at institutions of higher education, specifically to promote the use of technology in such study through the creation of accurate models that can simulate processes or recreate real life.
        • $8 million for a Basic Needs Grants pilot to help support college students achieve academic success by meeting their basic needs, such as housing, food, transportation, and access to physical and mental health.
        • $5 million for Menstrual Products Programs to support the students and provide free menstrual products on college campuses.
        • $5 million for the Center of Excellence in Spatial Computing program to help meet the growing need for a spatial computing workforce.
        • $5 million for the Distributed Higher Education Digital Infrastructure Pilot to establish a pilot program supporting a collaboration between colleges with established remote learning infrastructure and Minority Serving Institutions.
        • $1 million for Transitioning Gang-Involved Youth to Higher Education to help gang-involved youth pursue higher education.

Related Agencies –

  • $1.3 billion for the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), an increase of $194 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $105 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Within the total amount, the bill includes:
    • $601 million for AmeriCorps State and National Grants, an increase of $146 million over the FY 2021 enacted level.
    • $245 million for SeniorCorps programs, an increase of $20 million over the FY 2021 enacted level.
  • $565 million for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), in 2024 advance funding, an increase of $90 million above the FY 2023 enacted level and the President’s budget request.  In addition, the bill includes $20 million for the interconnection system and system wide infrastructure, equal to the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
  • $282 million for the Institute of Museum and Library Services, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $17 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $317 million for the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), an increase of $43 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $15 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes $1 million and new bill language for the NLRB to establish and administer a process for electronic voting.
  • $14.1 billion for the Social Security Administration’s (SSA) operating expenses, an increase of $1.1 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level.

Policy Provisions

Defending Reproductive Health Care

  • Access to Reproductive Health Care—The bill eliminates the Hyde and Weldon amendments, long-standing discriminatory policy which denied low-income women their legal right to an abortion.
  • Title X Family Planning—The bill includes language consistent with the Administration’s proposed new Title X rule, which will help restore grant funding to Planned Parenthood and other health clinics that offer the full range of reproductive health services.

Protecting Migrants

  • Influx Shelters—The bill limits funds from being used to house unaccompanied children in the custody of the Office of Refugee Resettlement in unlicensed facilities that do not come into compliance with Flores Settlement Agreement requirements and meet monitoring and compliance requirements.
  • Congressional Oversight—The bill includes a modification of the FY 2021 enacted provision relating to Members of Congress and oversight of facilities responsible for the care of unaccompanied children.
  • Confidentiality of Information and Counseling Sessions—The bill protects the confidentiality of information collected from unaccompanied children during case management, clinical or counselling sessions, and prohibits the sharing of information provided by unaccompanied children for use in immigration enforcement or removal proceedings.

Protecting Workers Rights

  • Merit Staffing—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting the use of funds to implement a final rule that would privatize job search functions and other essential services offered through the Employment Service system.
  • Apprenticeships—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting implementation of the IRAP final rule.

Protecting Civil Rights

  • Preventing Discrimination in Foster Care—The bill includes a new provision prohibiting funds from being awarded to a foster care organization that does not comply with nondiscrimination regulations related to age, disability, sex, race, color, national origin, religion, gender identity, or sexual orientation.

Expanding Opportunity and Ensuring Accountability in Education

  • Pell for Dreamers—The bill includes new language allowing DREAMERs and students with temporary protected status to be eligible for Pell Grants, as well as other categories of student financial assistance, including Federal student loans.
  • For-Profit College Accountability—The bill includes new language requiring for-profit colleges to derive more of their revenue from non-Federal sources.
  • ForProfit Entities—The bill includes new language preventing Federal funds from being awarded to charter schools run by for-profit entities.

Supporting People with Disabilities

  • Administrative Law Judges—The bill includes a provision prohibiting the Social Security Administration from implementing or enforcing a rule that replaces an individual’s right to appeal their denied application for Social Security or SSI benefits before an independent administrative law judge at a hearing with an appeal before an SSA staff attorney.

Helping Reduce Injection-Related Infections to Save Lives

  • Syringe Exchange—The bill removes a longstanding general provision that prohibited federal funds from being used to purchase syringes as part of a public health campaign to provide services to individuals involved in injection drug use.

Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies

Bill Text | Committee Report

The 2022 Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies funding bill provides discretionary funding of $26.55 billion – a critical increase of $2.851 billion, 12 percent – above 2021. In total, the bill includes $196.7 billion for both discretionary programs funded on an annual basis and mandatory programs such as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. The legislation:

  • Tackles hunger and nutrition insecurity by expanding access to fruits and vegetables to 6.4 million people through WIC and ensuring 45 million people in SNAP-eligible families get the benefits they need. The bill also invests in the health of America’s kids through Child Nutrition programs, like school meals – which are now the healthiest source of food consumed in the United States.
  • Grows opportunity and lifts up rural communities by increasing funding for rural broadband, connecting more communities to the internet through a program that last year got more than 100,000 people connected to the 21st century economy.
  • Rebuilds our public health and consumer safety infrastructure with increased funding to address maternal and infant nutrition, including resources for the ‘Closer to Zero’ initiative to reduce exposure to toxic elements in babies’ and young children’s food, emerging food-related chemical and toxicological issues, drug safety oversight, as well as providing additional resources for in-person inspections of the two largest international drug manufacturing countries, and drug and device supply chain monitoring and surveillance. The bill also invests in our public health infrastructure by modernizing FDA’s data infrastructure to better ensure the safety and security of the food and medical supply chain.
  • Confronts the climate crisis with $347.4 million across USDA to address the impacts of climate change. These investments are aimed to tackle the climate crisis in farming and rural communities and include research to monitor, measure, and mitigate climate change, accelerate climate smart agriculture practices, reduce greenhouse gases, and advance clean energy technologies.
  • Provides important investments to ensure equitable participation in USDA programs. In total, the bill provides more funding than the request to advance racial justice, including increases for extension, research, and capacity grants at our 1890 land grants, 1994 land grants, and Hispanic serving institutions to help strengthen the pipeline for the future of agriculture. It also provides funding to improve outreach and program access to historically underserved communities and provides a healthy increase for USDA’s Office of Civil Rights above the request.

Summary:

Rural Development and Infrastructure – The bill provides a total of more than $4.695 billion for rural development programs. These programs help create an environment for economic growth by providing business and housing opportunities and building sustainable rural infrastructure for the modern economy.

  • Rural Broadband – The legislation invests over $907 million, an increase of $165 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, in the expansion of broadband service to provide economic development opportunities and improved education and healthcare services. This includes $800 million for the ReConnect program. These significant investments in broadband reflect a commitment to enabling Americans in rural communities to access digital tools necessary to improve health, educational, and economic outcomes. Since 2019, more than 200,000 rural residents have gained access to broadband through these programs.
  • Critical Infrastructure – The legislation includes responsible investments in infrastructure to help rural areas of the country access basic utilities. This includes $1.45 billion for rural water and waste program loans, and over $716 million in water and waste grants for clean and reliable drinking water systems and sanitary waste disposal systems, which will provide safe drinking water to millions of rural residents. An additional $7.195 billion in loan authority is provided for rural electric and telephone infrastructure loans.
  • Rural Housing Loans and Rental Assistance – The bill provides a total of $30 billion in loan authority for the Single Family Housing Guaranteed Loan Program. The bill includes $1.5 billion in direct single family housing loans, meeting the estimated need for these loans, which provide home loan assistance to low-income rural families, many of whom would have few loan options for purchasing a home because of their geographical location. In addition, a total of $1.495 billion is provided for rental assistance and rental vouchers for affordable rental housing for low-income families and the elderly in rural communities to renew all existing rental assistance contracts. In FY 2020, Rural Development housing programs provided affordable housing to 138,331 rural homeowners.

Food and Nutrition Programs – The legislation contains discretionary funding, as well as mandatory funding required by law, for food and nutrition programs within the Department of Agriculture. This includes funding for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), and child nutrition programs.

  • Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) – The bill provides $6 billion in discretionary funding for WIC, including $834 million to increase the amounts of fruits and vegetables in the WIC Food Package. In FY 2022, WIC will serve an estimated 6.4 million women, infants, and children.
  • Child nutrition programs – The bill provides $26.9 billion in funding for child nutrition programs. This is an increase of $1.774 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level. As kids return to the classroom, this funding will support more than 5.2 billion school lunches and snacks. In addition, the bill provides $45 million for the Summer EBT program, $35 million for school kitchen equipment grants, and $10 million for school breakfast expansion grants.
  • Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) – The bill provides $105.792 billion in required mandatory spending for SNAP, including $3 billion for the SNAP reserve fund, which will serve more than 45 million people. For the first time ever, the bill provides additional protections for SNAP recipients by providing a “such sums” appropriations for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2022 to ensure SNAP does not run out of money.

International Food Assistance Programs – The legislation contains $2 billion for international food aid and to promote U.S. agricultural exports overseas. This includes $1.74 billion for Food for Peace grants and $245 million for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition program. In 2020, these programs, which work to reduce famine and increase food security overseas, provided food assistance to 15 countries.

Food and Drug Administration (FDA) – FDA receives a total of $3.471 billion in discretionary funding in the bill, an increase of $257 million above the FY 2021 enacted level. Total funding for FDA, including revenue from user fees, is $6.288 billion. Within this total, the Committee provides a targeted increase of $72 million to address the opioid crisis, medical supply chain surveillance, rare cancers, and increasing and strengthening in person inspections of foreign drug manufacturers. It also includes a $65 million increase to better avoid or more quickly respond to food outbreaks, improve the animal food inspection system, and addresses heavy metals in baby food. The bill also appropriates $50 million to accelerate medical product development as authorized in the 21st Century Cures Act.

Food Safety and Inspection Service – The legislation includes $1.153 billion for food safety and inspection programs. These mandatory inspection activities help ensure the safety and productivity of the country’s meat and poultry industry, and keep safe, healthy food on American tables. The funding provided will maintain more than 8,700 frontline inspection personnel for meat, poultry, and egg products at more than 6,500 facilities across the country.

Marketing Programs – The bill provides $223 million, $35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $10 million above the request, to facilitate the movement of agriculture products and open market opportunities. This includes $20.3 million for the National Organic Program to protect the integrity of the USDA Organic label and $16.7 million for the new hemp production program. The bill also provides $21.4 million in discretionary funds to the Agricultural Marketing Service and Rural Development for the Local Agriculture Market Program to continue supporting local food and value-added agriculture.

Farm Programs – The legislation provides $1.873 billion for farm programs, which is $48.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level. This includes $60 million to resolve ownership and succession of farmland issues, also known as heirs’ property issues. This funding will continue support for various farm, conservation, and emergency loan programs, and help American farmers and ranchers. It will also meet estimates of demand for farm loan programs.

Animal and Plant Health – The legislation includes $1.125 billion – $57 million above the FY 2021 enacted level – for the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. This funding will support programs to help control or eradicate plant and animal pests and diseases that can be crippling to U.S. producers. The funding level provides increases that will help address harmful pests and diseases such as cotton pests, spotted lanternfly, and chronic wasting disease, and support the growing needs of veterinary biological products such as vaccines and diagnostic tests while maintaining increases from past years for citrus greening.

Conservation Programs – The bill provides $1.06 billion to help farmers, ranchers, and other private landowners conserve and protect their land. This includes $170 million for infrastructure for watershed and flood prevention and watershed rehabilitation projects, $9.5 million for the Urban Agriculture and Innovative Production Program, and $10 million for the Healthy Forests Reserve Program.

Agricultural Research – The bill provides $3.391 billion – $321 million above the FY 2021 enacted level – for agriculture research programs, including the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture (NIFA). This funding will support research at all ARS facilities to help mitigate and stop devastating crop diseases, improve food safety and water quality, increase production, and combat antimicrobial resistance. This funding also includes important research investments in U.S. land-grant colleges and universities, including a significant increase for the 1890 institutions, and for the Agriculture and Food Research Initiative, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s premier competitive research program.

Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) – The bill provides $363 million for the CFTC – $59 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.

Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies

Bill Text | Committee Report

The 2022 Energy and Water Development and Related Agencies funding bill, provides $53.226 billion, an increase of $1.474 billion above 2021. The legislation:

  • Creates tens of thousands of good-paying jobs with a focus on deploying clean energy technologies and the green jobs of tomorrow in communities across the country
  • Confronts the climate crisis with more than $14 billion of transformative investments in clean energy and science, which will help develop clean, affordable, and secure American energy
  • Rebuilds our nation’s water infrastructure, critical to protecting communities from more frequent and severe storms and addressing the worsening drought

Summary:

Army Corps of Engineers – For fiscal year 2022, the bill provides a total of $8.66 billion, an increase of $1.9 billion above the President’s budget request.

  • Investigations – The bill provides $155 million, $2 million above fiscal year 2021 and $49.2 million above the request.
  • Construction – The bill provides $2.6 billion, $799.4 million above the request.
  • Operation and Maintenance – The bill provides $4.8 billion, an increase of $967.3 million above fiscal year 2021.
  • Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund projects receive an estimated $2.05 billion, an increase of $370 million above fiscal year 2021 and $424.1 million above the request. The bill provides these funds in accordance with the budgetary adjustments made by the CARES Act and the Water Resources Development Act of 2020.

Department of the Interior and Bureau of Reclamation – For fiscal year 2022, the bill provides a total of $1.97 billion for the Department, an increase of $274.9 million above fiscal year 2021 and $413 million above the President’s budget request.

  • Central Utah Project – The bill provides $20 million, the same as the budget request.
  • Bureau of Reclamation – The bill provides $1.95 billion, an increase of $276 million above fiscal year 2021 and $413 million above the request. Within Reclamation:
    • The bill provides $413 million in additional funding for water resources projects, including those authorized in the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation (WIIN) Act.
    • The bill provides $191.4 million for WaterSMART programs, $62.4 million above fiscal year 2021 and $137.4 million above the budget request, to assist western states and communities as they respond to the historic drought.
    • Within additional funding, $55.7 million above the request is provided for rural water projects.  

Department of Energy – For fiscal year 2022, the bill provides a total of $45.1 billion for the Department, an increase of $3.2 billion above fiscal year 2021 amounts.

  • Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy – The bill provides $3.77 billion, an increase of $906 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding provides for clean, affordable, and secure energy and ensures American leadership in the transition to a global clean energy economy.
    • Weatherization Assistance Program – The bill provides $375 million, an increase of $65 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding will support the weatherization of nearly 50,000 low-income households.
    • Build Back Better Challenge Grants – The bill provides $100 million for a new program to support novel state-, local-, and Tribal-level approaches that encourage early action and novel methods for clean energy deployment, prioritizing investments that meet energy needs at the local level and are inclusive in elevating impoverished, disenfranchised, marginalized, or overburdened communities.
         
  • Cybersecurity, Energy Security, and Emergency Response – The bill provides $177 million, an increase of $21 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding provides for efforts to secure the nation’s energy infrastructure against all hazards, reduce the risks of and impacts from cybersecurity events, and assist with restoration activities.
  • Electricity – The bill provides $267 million, an increase of $55 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding will advance technologies to increase the resiliency and efficiency of the nation’s electricity delivery system with capabilities to incorporate growing amounts of clean energy technologies.
  • Nuclear Energy – The bill provides $1.68 billion, an increase of $167 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. The funding invests in research, development, and demonstration activities that develop the next generation of clean and safe reactors, further improve the safety and economic viability of our current reactor fleet, and contribute to the nation’s long-term leadership in the global nuclear power industry.
  • Fossil Energy and Carbon Management – The bill provides $820 million, an increase of $70 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding advances carbon reduction and mitigation in sectors and applications that are difficult to decarbonize, including the industrial sector, with technologies and methods such as carbon capture and storage, hydrogen, and direct air capture,  while assisting in facilitating the transition toward a net-zero carbon economy and rebuilding a U.S. critical minerals supply chain.
  • Science – The bill provides $7.32 billion, an increase of $294 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. The Office of Science funds basic science research in physics, biology, chemistry, and other science disciplines to expand scientific understanding and secure the nation’s global leadership in energy innovation. The supported research supports nearly 28,000 researchers located at over 300 institutions, spanning all 50 states. The supported scientific user facilities serve over 36,000 users.
  • Nuclear Waste Disposal – The bill provides $27.5 million for interim storage of nuclear waste and oversight of the Nuclear Waste Fund.
  • Advanced Research Projects Agency—Energy – The bill provides $600 million, an increase of $173 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding supports research aimed at rapidly developing energy technologies that are capable of significantly changing the energy sector to address the nation’s critical economic, environmental, and energy security challenges.
  • Indian Energy Policy and Programs – The bill provides $70 million, an increase of $48 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding will provide technical assistance, direct and remote education, policy research and analysis, and financial assistance to Indian tribes, Alaska Native Village and Regional corporations, and Tribal Energy Resource Development Organizations.
  • National Nuclear Security Administration – The bill provides $20.2 billion for DOE’s nuclear security programs. This funding will maintain a safe, secure, and credible nuclear deterrent while addressing the threat of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. This includes:
    • Weapons Activities – $15.5 billion, equal to the budget request, to maintain a safe and reliable nuclear deterrent.
    • Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation – $2.34 billion, an increase of $80 million above the fiscal year 2021 level and $406 million above the request. This funding secures nuclear material at home and abroad, combats the threat of nuclear terrorism, and provides emergency response capabilities.
    • Naval Reactors – $1.87 billion, equal to the request, to continue safe and reliable operation of the Navy’s nuclear-powered fleet.
  • Environmental Management – The bill provides $7.76 billion, an increase of $171 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. This funding is used for nuclear cleanup work at 16 sites across the country. This includes:
    • Non-Defense Environmental Cleanup – $334 million, an increase of $14.7 million above the fiscal year 2021 level.
    • Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning – $831 million, equal to the budget request.
    • Defense Environmental Cleanup – $6.6 billion, an increase of $166 million above the fiscal year 2021 level
  • Loan Guarantee Programs – Maintains funding consistent with the fiscal year 2021 levels.
  • Power Marketing Administrations – The bill provides the net budget request levels for the Southeastern Power Administration, Southwestern Power Administration, and Western Area Power Administration.

Independent Agencies

  • Nuclear Regulatory Commission – The bill provides a total net appropriation of $131 million, equal to the request. This funds regulatory activities to ensure the safe use of nuclear reactors and radioactive materials while protecting people and the environment.
  • Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board – The bill provides $31 million, equal to the request. The Board provides recommendations regarding public health and safety matters at Department of Energy defense nuclear facilities.
  • Appalachian Regional Commission – The bill provides $210 million, an increase of $30 million above the fiscal year 2021 level. The Commission funds efforts in the Appalachian Region to promote economic and community development, education and job training, and critical infrastructure.
  • Delta Regional Authority – The bill provides $30 million, equal to fiscal year 2021. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of the Mississippi River Delta Region.
  • Denali Commission – The bill provides $15 million, equal to fiscal year 2021. This funding provides critical utilities, infrastructure, health services, and economic support throughout Alaska.
  • Northern Border Regional Commission – The bill provides $32 million, an increase of $2 million above fiscal year 2021 and $1.9 million above the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and New York.
  • Southeast Crescent Regional Commission – The bill provides $2.5 million, equal to the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia.
  • Southwest Border Regional Commission – The bill provides $2.5 million, equal to the request. This funding targets the economic development needs of distressed portions of Arizona, California, New Mexico, and Texas.
  • Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board – The bill provides $3.8 million equal to the request. The Board provides independent technical oversight of the Department of Energy’s nuclear waste disposal program.

Financial Services and General Government

Bill Text | Committee Report

The 2022 Financial Services and General Government funding bill includes $29.1 billion, an increase of $4.8 billion over 2021. The legislation:

  • Assists small businesses and entrepreneurs through the Small Business Administration and Community Development Financial Institutions
  • Protects our democracy with Election Security Grants to ensure the integrity and safety of our elections
  • Rebuilds the Internal Revenue Service to finally crack down on big corporations and the wealthy who aren’t paying their fair share and to provide better customer service to working families navigating the tax system
  • Supports working and middle-class families by increasing funding for consumer protection activities at the Consumer Product Safety Commission and the Federal Trade Commission
  • Confronts the climate crisis by providing funding to start the transition of the Federal vehicle fleet to electric and zero emission vehicles

Summary:

Department of the Treasury – For fiscal year 2022, the bill provides a total of $15.4 billion in discretionary appropriations for the Department, an increase of $1.9 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s request. Of the total provided for the Department of the Treasury, the bill includes:

  • $330 million for Community Development Financial Institutions, an increase of $60 million above the FY 2021 enacted level. The total amount includes $212 million for financial and technical assistance grants and $10 million to increase the availability and affordability of small-dollar loans.
  • $270.7 million for Departmental Offices Salaries and Expenses, an increase of $37.7 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
  • $235.1 million for Inspectors General offices for the Treasury Department, an increase of $4.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to ensure robust oversight of Departmental policies and practices.
  • $190.5 million for the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network, an increase of $63.6 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to boost efforts to combat terrorist financing and money laundering.
  • $185.2 million for the Office of Terrorism and Financial Intelligence, an increase of $10.2 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to continue investments to protect the integrity of the financial system.
  • $132 million for the Department’s Cybersecurity Enhancement Account, an increase of $114 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to address the impacts of the SolarWinds attack and minimize the impact of future attacks.
  • $131.3 million for the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, an increase of $7 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
  • Internal Revenue Service (IRS) – The bill includes $13.6 billion for the IRS, an increase of $1.7 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level. Included in this amount is a $417 million program integrity allocation adjustment to increase tax collections and reduce the tax gap.  Of this amount, the bill includes:
     
    • $2.9 billion, an increase of $385 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Taxpayer Services. This total includes support for the Volunteer Income Tax Assistance Matching Grants Program, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic, the Taxpayer Advocate, Tax Counseling for the Elderly, and increased personnel to improve IRS customer service.  
    • $5.8 billion, an increase of $538 million, including the program integrity allocation adjustment, above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Enforcement. These funds support increased enforcement efforts and additional essential personnel.
    • $4.6 billion, an increase of $650 million, including the program integrity allocation adjustment, above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Operations Support.
    • $305 million, an increase of $82 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Business Systems Modernization to modernize IRS legacy systems and improve IRS Web applications.

Executive Office of the President – The bill includes a total of $841.1 million, an increase of $82.3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $15.3 million above the President’s budget request.

  • Office of Administration – The bill provides $110.8 million, an increase of $10.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level. This includes $4.5 million in funding to pay White House and other Executive Office of the President interns, in line with recent actions by Congress to pay its interns.
  • Office of Management and Budget (OMB) The bill provides $122.9 million for OMB, an increase of $16.3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $1 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Office of the National Cyber Director – The bill provides $18.8 million in funding to stand up a new Office of the National Cyber Director to help coordinate Federal cybersecurity policy and strategy.
  • Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) – The bill includes a total of $457.9 million for ONDCP, including:
    • $300 million for the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas Program, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level; and
    • $110 million for the Drug-Free Communities Program, an increase of $8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.

The Judiciary – The bill includes a total of $8.2 billion in discretionary appropriations, an increase of $432.3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.

  • Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services – $5.7 billion, an increase of $331 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to support court operations and increased services in Probation and Pretrial.
  • Defender Services – $1.37 billion, an increase of $52 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to support operations and expenses associated with panel attorney compensation.
  • Court Security – $682 million, an increase of $18 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to support security needs and protective services in courthouses, as identified by the U.S. Marshals Service.

Additionally, the bill extends temporary judgeships in several districts.

District of Columbia – The bill includes a total of $794.5 million, an increase of $47 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.

  • $40 million for D.C. Resident Tuition Support, equal to the FY 2021 enacted level.
  • $5 million, an increase of $1 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for HIV/AIDS Testing and Treatment to help prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS in the District of Columbia.
  • $8 million, equal to the FY 2021 enacted level, to fund infrastructure improvements for the D.C. Water and Sewer Authority.

In addition, the bill removes objectionable policy riders previously carried that undermine home rule in the District of Columbia:

  • Eliminates a ban on the use of local and Federal funds for abortion services;
  • Eliminates a ban on the use of local funds to legalize marijuana;
  • Eliminates a ban on the use of funds for needle exchange programs; and
  • Eliminates a provision appropriating local District funds.

The bill also restricts the President’s ability to federalize the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department.

Independent Agencies:

  • Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) – The bill funds the CPSC at $172 million, an increase of $37 million above the FY 2021 enacted level. Within the total, $2 million is provided for Virginia Graeme Baker Pool Safety grants.
  • Election Assistance Commission (EAC) – The bill provides $500 million for Election Security Grants, an increase of $400 million above the request, to augment State efforts to improve the security and integrity of elections for Federal office. In addition, $22.8 million is included for EAC operating expenses, an increase of $5.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.
  • Federal Communications Commission (FCC) – The bill includes $388 million for the FCC, an increase of $14 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to support efforts to expand broadband access, improve the security of U.S. telecommunications networks, and administer billions in COVID-19 relief programs.
  • Federal Trade Commission (FTC) – The bill includes $390 million for the FTC, an increase of $39 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, to bolster antitrust and consumer protection work.
  • General Services Administration (GSA) Federal Buildings Fund (FBF) The bill includes $10.4 billion in spending authority for the FBF. The total funding level includes:
    • $254 million for Washington, DC Department of Homeland Security Consolidation at St. Elizabeths and $103 million for Calexico, CA Land Port of Entry;
    • $1 billion for Repairs and Alterations; and
    • $300 million for the Electric Vehicle Fund to transform the Federal vehicle fleet to electric and zero emission vehicles.
  • National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) The bill provides a total of $456 million for NARA, an increase of $58 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $30 million above the President’s request. This supports NARA’s activities to increase access to records that document the history of underserved and underrepresented communities in America. This amount also includes $2 million for implementation of the Civil Rights Cold Case Record Collections Act of 2018, $9.5 million for the National Historical Publications & Records Commission Grants Program, and $30 million to help prepare for the 250th anniversary of the founding of the United States.
  • Office of Personnel Management (OPM) – The bill includes $372 million, an increase of $42 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for OPM to manage and provide guidance on Federal human resources and administer Federal retirement and health benefit programs.
  • Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) – The bill includes $2 billion, an increase of $73.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for the SEC to monitor the capital and securities markets, ensure full disclosure of appropriate financial information, and combat financial fraud and malpractice. This amount also includes funding for move costs related to the SEC’s Fort Worth regional offices.
  • Small Business Administration (SBA) – The bill provides a total of $1 billion for SBA, an increase of $111.9 million above the FY 2021 enacted level.  The bill supports the President’s budget proposal to invest in programs to help underserved entrepreneurs access capital and contracting opportunities. The bill includes $323.8 million, an increase of $51.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, for Entrepreneurial Development Programs, including:
    • $140 million for Small Business Development Centers;
    • $41 million for Microloan Technical Assistance;
    • $30 million for the Federal and State Technology Partnership Program, Growth Accelerators, and Regional Innovation Clusters; and
    • $26 million for Women’s Business Centers.

Important Policy Changes:

  • Strengthens our democracy:
    • Campaign Finance TransparencyEliminates three provisions that limit transparency into political spending.
    • Apportionment Transparency Includes a new provision requiring OMB to make apportionments of appropriations publicly available in a timely manner and provides $1 million to OMB to implement such a system.
    • Improvements in Budget Execution Includes new provisions that require budget authority be made available prudently for obligation, executive agencies to provide budget and appropriations information to the Government Accountability Office (GAO) promptly, and agencies to notify Congress of certain delays or restrictions in apportionment of appropriations.
    • RecordkeepingIncludes a new provision related to recordkeeping requirements for certain GAO audits.
  • Respects the dignity of immigrants: Includes new language making Dreamers eligible for Federal employment.
  • Fosters equality for women and men: Eliminates provisions preventing the FEHBP from covering abortion services.
  • Supports equity and inclusion: Includes a new provision that creates a commission to identify and recommend name changes or removal of Federal property that is inconsistent with the values of diversity, equity, and inclusion.

 

Interior and Environment, and Related Agencies

Bill Text | Committee Report

The 2022 Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill, includes $43.4 billion in regular appropriations, an increase of $7.3 billion – 20.2 percent – above 2021. There is also an additional $2.45 billion of funding for fire suppression. The legislation:

  • Creates good-paying American jobs through investments in renewable energy development, including offshore wind, and a national initiative to reclaim abandoned mines and cap orphan oil and gas wells
  • Confronts the climate crisis by expanding environmental enforcement efforts, creating a Civilian Climate Corps, and launching a renewed focus on land and water conservation
  • Supports Native American families by investing in a strong and resilient Indian Country, including through education and health care programs
  • Dramatically expands environmental justice efforts to address unacceptable pollution in communities of color
  • Honors the federal government’s responsibilities to Native Americans

Summary:

(In FY 2022, Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) allocations are maintained as mandatory appropriations.)

Department of the Interior (DOI) – The bill provides a total of $15.6 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOI, an increase of $2.3 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $240 million below the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $1.6 billion for the Bureau of Land Management (MLR/O&C), $285 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $26 million below the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
  • $80 million for sage-grouse conservation, and $66.5 million for the National Landscape Conservation System.  It also provides $162 million for the Wild Horse and Burro program which includes $11 million for research on reversible immunocontraceptive fertility control and its administration.
  • $1.9 billion for U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, an increase of $301 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $32 million below the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes: 
    • $315million for Ecological Services, an increase of $45.5 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $17 million below the President’s budget request.
    • $582 million for National Wildlife Refuge System, an increase of $78 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $2 million below the President’s budget request.
    • $22 million for Multinational Species Conservation Fund, an increase of $4 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
    • $82 million for State and Tribal Wildlife Grants, an increase of $10 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $3.5 billion for National Park Service, an increase of $324 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $28 million below the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $3 billion for Operation of the National Park System, an increase of $277 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $12 million below the President’s budget request.
    • $80 million for National Recreation and Preservation, an increase of $6 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $6 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $156 million for the Historic Preservation Fund, an increase of $12 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $4 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes $81 million for State and Tribal Historic Preservation Offices, $30 million for Save America’s Treasures grants, $28 million for competitive grants to preserve the sites and stories of underrepresented community civil rights, and $10 million for grants to Historically Black Colleges and Universities.
  • $1.6 billion for the U.S. Geological Survey, an increase of $327 million above the enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $223.93 million for the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, an increase of $31.12 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $3.85 million below the President’s budget request.
    • $45.82 million for the Renewable Energy Program, an increase of $17.35 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $4 billion for Bureau of Indian Affairs, Bureau of Indian Education, and Office of the Special Trustee, an increase of $507 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $65 million below the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $1.9 billion for Bureau of Indian Affairs Operation of Indian Programs, an increase of $308 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $8 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $75 million for a new Indian Land Consolidation account to acquire fractionated interests in trust land.
    • $188 million for Bureau of Indian Affairs Construction, an increase of $59 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
    • $11.8 million for the Indian Guaranteed Loan Program, equal to the FY 2021 enacted level and the President’s budget request.
    • $1.1 billion for Bureau of Indian Education Operation of Indian Programs, an increase of $110 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
    • $267 million to Bureau of Indian Education Construction, an increase of $3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $3 million above the President’s budget request.
    • Fully funds Contract Support Costs and Payments for Tribal Leases.
    • $110 million for Office of the Special Trustee, an increase of $1 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $110 million above the President’s budget request.
  • $421 million for Departmental Offices, $57 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $6 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $128 million for Office of Insular Affairs, an increase of $12.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $5.5 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $120 million for Energy Community Revitalization Program to address hard rock mining and orphaned oil and gas wells.

Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) – The bill provides a total of $11.34 billion in for EPA – an increase of $2.11 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $110.8 million above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $4.17 billion for EPA’s core science and environmental program work, an increase of $681 million above the FY 2021 enacted level. Within these amounts, the bill includes:
    • $642.7 million for Geographic Programs which help with restoration of nationally significant bodies of water like the Great Lakes, Chesapeake Bay, and Long Island Sound. This is an increase of $100.8 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $64.4 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $61.8 million in funding for scientific and regulatory work on per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), needed to establish drinking water and cleanup standards. This funding builds on the $49 million the EPA received in 2021.
  • $5.32 billion for State and Tribal Assistance Grants, an increase of $1.01 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $194 million above the President’s budget request. Within this amount, the bill includes:
    • $3.23 billion for Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving Funds, $464 million above the enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This includes $428.6 million Community Project Funding for over 280 drinking water, wastewater, and storm water management projects across the country.
    • $326.6 million for targeted grants for drinking water contaminants and wastewater treatment for lead, nitrates, and other health hazards, an increase of $117.5 million above the enacted level and $7.6 million above the request.
    • $131 million for Brownfields cleanups, a $49 million increase above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
    • $150 million for Diesel Emissions Reduction grants, an increase of $60 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $1.54 billion for Superfund, an increase of $331 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $2.5 million above the President’s request.
  • $248 million for Environmental Justice activities, an increase of $235 million above the FY 2021 level. This includes:
    • $148 million in programmatic funds to expand EPA’s ability to incorporate environmental justice considerations into all aspects of its work, and support other federal agencies’ environmental justice efforts.
    • $100 million for six new environmental justice grant programs designed to begin implementing environmental justice solutions on the ground in frontline and fenceline communities. 

Wildland Fire Management (WFM) – The bill provides $5.66 billion for WFM, which includes $2.45 billion in cap adjusted fire suppression funding. The total funding is $385.82 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $380 thousand below the President’s budget request.

Related Agencies –

  • $4.14 billion for the Forest Service (non-fire/without LWCF), an increase of $680.49 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $50.43 million below the President’s budget request.
  • $8.1 billion for the Indian Health Service, an increase of $1.8 billion above the FY 2021 enacted level and $7.8 billion below the President’s budget request.
    • $5.8 billion for Health Services, an increase of $189 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $101 million above the President’s budget request.
    • $1.3 billion for Health Facilities, an increase of $351 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and $232 million below the President’s budget request.
    • Fully funds Contract Support Costs and Payments for Tribal Leases.
  • $201 million each for the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities, an increase of $33.5 million above the 2021 enacted levels, $23.45 million over the requested level for the National Endowment for the Humanities and equal to the request for National Endowment for the Arts.
  • $1.102 billion for the Smithsonian Institution, an increase of $69.3 million above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $14.1 million for the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, an increase of $95,000 above the FY 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $40.4 million for the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, equal to the 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $62.6 million for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, an increase of $1.2 million above the enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.

Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) – The bill allocates $900 million for land acquisition and support for state recreation programs.

Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies

Bill Text | Committee Report

The 2022 Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Appropriations bill provides $279.9 billion, an increase of $28.1 billion – more than 10 percent – above 2021. Of this amount, discretionary funding for programs such as veterans’ health care and Military Construction totals $124.5 billion, an increase of $11.4 billion above 2021. The legislation:

  • Supports our veterans with investments in health care, including targeted investments that advance women’s health, mental health, and homelessness assistance
  • Rebuilds our infrastructure with strong investments to construct critical facilities on military installations including family housing and child development centers, and build, repair, and retrofit Veterans Affairs facilities
  • Protects our national security with investments to respond to the challenges posed by Russian and Chinese aggression
  • Confronts the climate crisis with increased climate change and resiliency funding to help military installations adapt to rising sea levels and worsening natural disasters

Summary:

Military Construction – The bill provides a total of $10.9 billion for military construction – $2.9 billion above the 2021 enacted level and $1.07 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $213 million for Child Development Centers, of which $33 million is for planning and design for future facilities, and in total is $193 million above the FY 2022 budget request. The funds will support increased capacity and better facilities for the 1.2 million children of active duty servicemembers worldwide.
  • $1.423 billion for Family Housing, an increase of $87 million above the 2021 enacted level and the same as the budget request. Within this amount, Family Housing Support and Management is funded at $116.2 million to address issues such as mold, vermin, and lead in military family housing.
  • $849.2 million for construction or alteration of Guard and Reserve facilities in states and territories, an increase of $253 million above the 2021 enacted level and $179.2 million above the FY 2022 budget request.
  • $205.8 million for the NATO Security Investment Program, an increase of $32.8 million above the 2021 enacted level and equal to the FY 2022 budget request, for infrastructure necessary for wartime, crisis, and peace support and deterrence operations, and training requirements. The funds will support responses to the challenges posed by Russian aggression as well as the risks and threats emanating from the Middle East and North Africa.
  • $564.6 million for Base Realignment and Closure, an increase of $84.1 million above the 2021 enacted level and $280 million above the FY 2022 budget request. Within this amount, cleanup of Perfluorooctane Sulfanate and Perfluorooctanoic Acid contamination is funded at $150 million.
  • $149.8 million for Cost to Complete Projects, which includes $31.5 million for family housing construction.
  • $162.9 million for Natural Disaster Recovery Construction, to be distributed amongst the Air Force and Navy & Marine Corps.
  • $100 million for the Army National Guard transformation plan to accelerate construction of facilities and $50 million for planning and design towards future facilities.
  • $550 million for Barracks for Unaccompanied Soldiers at various locations, $237.2 million above the FY 2022 budget request.
  • $100 million for Climate Change and Resiliency Projects, which is $86 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, and $100 million above the FY 2022 budget request.
  • $475 million for Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Plan (SIOP) projects, which is $379 million above the FY 2021 enacted level, and $225 million above the FY 2022 budget request.

Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) – The bill provides a total of $113.1 billion in discretionary appropriations for VA, an increase of $8.7 billion above the 2021 enacted level and $176.4 million above the President’s budget request. These resources will serve to expand access to services for Veterans and will boost oversight and accountability across the department. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $97.6 billion for Veterans Medical Care, an increase of $7.6 billion above the 2021 enacted level and $100 million above the President’s budget request. This will provide care for 7.1 million patients expected to be treated by VA in FY 2022. Of this amount:
    • $13.2 billion for Mental Healthcare, an increase of $2.9 billion above the 2021 enacted level and $1 million above the President’s budget request, including $599 million for suicide prevention outreach. This will support the nearly 2 million Veterans who receive mental health services in a VA specialty mental health setting, as well as support suicide prevention services like the Veterans Crisis Line, which saw an increase in demand by over 59% in the last year.
    • $778.5 million for Gender-specific Care for Women, an increase of $117.8 million above the 2021 enacted level and $73 million above the President’s budget request. Women are the fastest growing cohort within the Veteran community, with nearly 561,000 women Veterans using VA health services.
    • $2.2 billion for Homeless Assistance Programs, an increase of $246 million above the 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This funding will enhance VA’s ability to reach homeless Veterans, which is particularly crucial as the most recent homelessness survey showed that on a given night in January 2020, an estimated 37,252 Veterans were experiencing homelessness.
       
    • $621 million for Opioid Abuse Prevention, an increase of $149 million above the 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This funding will allow for more targeted funding of pain management and opioid safety programs primarily at the facility level.
    • $307 million for Rural Health Initiatives, an increase of $7 million above the 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. This will build upon VA’s success in having served 2.9 million Veterans at 600 rural serving sites.
    • $84 million for Whole Health Initiatives, an increase of $10 million above the 2021 enacted level and $10 million above the President’s budget request. This will enable VA to build upon the success of this program that focuses on Veterans’ overall health and well-being, which has already reached 346,629 Veterans, or 7.41% of active VA users.
  • Additionally, the bill includes $111.3 billion in advance fiscal year 2023 funding for Veterans’ medical care – equal to the President’s budget request. This funding will provide for medical services, medical community care, medical support and compliance, and medical facilities, and ensure that our Veterans have continued, full access to their medical care needs.
  • $902 million for Medical and Prosthetic Research, an increase of $87 million above the 2021 enacted level and $20 million above the President’s budget request. This funding will allow VA to exceed the budget request’s target of funding approximately 2,563 total projects, supporting more than 1,700 researchers, and partnering with more than 200 medical schools and other academic institutions.
  • $2.6 billion to continue implementation of the VA Electronic Health Record System, an increase of $10 million above the 2021 enacted level and $26 million below the President’s budget request. These funds will allow VA to support continued, robust deployment of the new electronic health record system at VA medical centers and allow for intensive staff training, critical to the success of the effort. The bill also continues GAO oversight of this program to ensure that the EHR system is implemented in a timely manner.
  • $2.2 billion for VA Construction, an increase of $458 million above the 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request. Within this amount, $1.6 billion is for Major Construction and $553 million is for Minor Construction. This increase will support VA’s highest priority projects and correct critical seismic and safety deficiencies and address other performance gaps at VA facilities to ensure that Veterans can access care in modern facilities that are safe, secure, sustainable, and accessible.
  • $3.4 billion for operating expenses of the Veterans Benefits Administration, an increase of $239 million above the 2021 enacted level, to ensure the prompt processing of disability claims. This increase will allow VA to complete an estimated 1.7 million disability compensation claims in 2022 and support service-connected compensation payments to an estimated 5.5 million Veterans, 500,000 survivors and dependents. In addition, pension payments will be funded for more than 350,000 Veterans and their survivors. The bill also continues rigorous reporting requirements to track each regional office’s performance on claims processing and appeals backlogs.
    • Additionally, the bill includes $156.6 billion in advance mandatory funding for VA benefit programs, equal to the President’s budget request.
       

Related Agencies – The bill provides a total of $434.8 million in discretionary appropriations for related agencies, an increase of $156.5 million above the 2021 enacted level and $5 million above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

  • $228 million for Arlington National Cemetery, including $141 million to complete the urgently needed Southern Expansion project that will create 80,000 additional burial spaces. This is an increase of $146.2 million above the 2021 enacted level and equal to the President’s budget request.
     
  • $88.1 million for the American Battle Monuments Commission, $4 million above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $3.3 million more than the President’s budget request. This will support continued maintenance of the graves of 124,000 American war dead in overseas cemeteries, as well as visitor and education services for the more than 3 million visitors expected to visit these sites in FY 2022.
     
  • $77 million for the Armed Forces Retirement Home, $1.7 million above the 2021 enacted level and $1.7 million above the President’s budget request. This will support the needs of the over 800 residents at the two retirement home campuses and invest in critical life and safety infrastructure improvements.
     

Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies

Bill Text | Committee Report

The 2022 Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies funding bill provides funding of $84.1 billion, an increase of $8.7 billion – more than 11 percent – above 2021. This includes an increase of $6.8 billion is for the Department of Housing and Urban Development and $1.9 billion for the Department of Transportation. In total, the bill provides $162.6 billion in budgetary resources, an increase of $25.9 billion above 2021. The legislation:

  • Creates tens of thousands of good-paying American jobs by rebuilding our crumbling infrastructure with significant investments in airports, highways, transit, passenger rail, and port systems
  • Grows opportunity through homeownership and rental assistance, including more than 125,000 new housing vouchers targeted to individuals and families experiencing or at risk of homelessness and over 4,000 new units for seniors and persons with disabilities
  • Supports the vulnerable with public housing safety, maintenance and improvement investments, such as the remediation of lead paint and radon and installation of energy and water efficient systems
  • Promotes safe transportation and housing with a skilled and growing workforce to conduct inspections, mitigate hazards, and study emerging threats and innovative solutions
  • Reduces emissions, increases resiliency, and addresses historical inequities in transportation and housing programs through targeted grants and investments

Summary:

Department of Transportation (DOT)—For fiscal year 2022, the bill provides a total of $105.7 billion in budgetary resources for DOT – an increase of $19 billion above the fiscal year 2021 enacted level and $18.7 billion above the President’s 2022 budget request. The legislation:

  • Creates and leverages tens of thousands of additional jobs in construction and related industries.
  • Invests more than $250 million to reduce transportation emissions, increase resiliency, and address historical inequities.
  • Improves the safety of our highways, aviation, transit, rail, and port systems.
  • Fixes roads and highways, expands bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure, supports Federal auto safety programs, and invests in the transit state of good repair, consistent with the INVEST in America Act.
  • Funds more than 300 zero emission buses, 400 diesel buses, and constructs more than 23 new, fixed-route transit projects nationwide.
  • Nearly doubles investments in passenger and freight rail and expands port infrastructure programs by nearly a third.

The bill includes:

  • $1.2 billion for National Infrastructure Investments (RAISE/TIGER/BUILD), an increase of $200 million from fiscal year 2021, including $20 million for Transportation Planning Grants to assist areas of persistent poverty, $10 million above fiscal year 2021.  An additional $100 million is included for a new grant program to spur Thriving Communities nationwide.
  • Robust increases for Research and Technology to expand research on ways to create more equitable access to transportation systems, combat climate change, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions, as well as a 79 percent increase in cybersecurity initiatives to safeguard our transportation systems. An additional $5 million to support the Highly Automated Systems Safety Center of Excellence to coordinate DOT’s technical expertise around automated systems.
  • Improvements to our aviation system by providing $18.9 billion for the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), $896 million above fiscal year 2021, including $1.5 billion for Aviation Safety and $400 million for discretionary Airport Improvement Grants and projects.
  • $61.9 billion for the Federal Highway Administration for formula programs funded from the Highway Trust Fund that improve the safety and long-term viability of our nation’s highway systems.
  • $886 million for the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration and $1.3 billion for the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to make trucks, cars, and the nation’s roads safer, consistent with the INVEST in America Act.
  • Advances the safety and reliability of our passenger and freight rail systems by providing $4.1 billion for the Federal Railroad Administration, an increase of $1.3 billion above fiscal year 2021. This includes:
    • $625 million for the new Passenger Rail Improvement, Modernization, and Expansion (PRIME) grant program, to support projects that improve, expand, or establish passenger rail service.
    • $500 million for the Consolidated Rail Infrastructure and Safety Improvements grant program, $125 million above fiscal year 2021.
    • $2.7 billion for Amtrak, $700 million above fiscal year 2021, including $1.2 billion for Northeast Corridor Grants and $1.5 billion for National Network Grants.
  • $15.5 billion for the Federal Transit Administration, including $12.2 billion for Transit Formula Grants to expand bus fleets and increase the transit state of good repair; $2.5 billion for Capital Investment Grants, to construct more than 23 new transit routes nationwide, an increase of $459 million above the fiscal year fiscal year 2021 enacted level, and equal to the President’s budget request; and $580 million for Transit Infrastructure Grants, to purchase more than 300 zero emission buses, 400 diesel buses, and to support transformative research for transit systems, an increase of $64 million above the fiscal year 2021.
  • $1.3 billion for the Maritime Administration, $84 million above fiscal year 2021, including $318 million for the Maritime Security Program, $60 million to establish the Tanker Security Fleet program, $300 million for the Port Infrastructure Development Program, an increase of $70 million above fiscal year 2021 enacted level, and $320.6 million for schoolship construction and related shore-side infrastructure, which fully funds the fifth and final schoolship.
  • Community projects identified by 145 Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle that increase the safety and viability of our airports, highways, and transit systems.

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)—For fiscal year 2022, the bill provides a total of $56.5 billion for HUD – an increase of $6.8 billion above fiscal year 2021 and $314 million below the President’s 2022 budget request.  The legislation:

  • Expands housing choice vouchers to more than 125,000 low-income individuals and families experiencing or at risk of homelessness, including survivors of domestic violence and veterans.
  • Protects housing assistance for more than 4.8 million individuals and families to ensure they continue to remain in safe, stable, and affordable housing.
  • Includes over $11.3 billion in funding for new affordable housing, critical health, safety, and maintenance improvements to ensure the safety and quality of public and low-income housing, and community development activities, including $365 million to construct over 4,000 new affordable housing units for seniors and persons with disabilities, $1.85 billion in direct funding to states and local governments through the HOME Investment Partnerships Program, and doubles the number of distressed neighborhoods that could be revitalized through the Choice Neighborhoods Initiative program.
  • Reduces the carbon footprint by investing more than $205 million across the Department to improve energy and water efficiency and increase resiliency in public and low-income housing.

The bill includes:

  • $29.2 billion for Tenant-based Rental Assistance to continue to serve more than 2.3 million very low- and extremely low-income households nationwide. This level of funding also includes $1 billion to expand housing assistance to more than 125,000 low-income families, including individuals and families experiencing or at risk of homelessness, including survivors of domestic violence and veterans. A combined $25 million is provided for the HUD/VA Supportive Housing for Homeless Veterans and Native American Veterans programs.
  • $8.64 billion for Public Housing, $834 million above fiscal year 2021, including $3.4 billion to meet the full annual capital accrual need in order to improve the quality and safety of public housing for more than 2 million residents.
  • $600 million for Housing Opportunities for Persons with AIDS, to protect housing and services for more than 75,000 low-income people living with HIV, an increase of $170 million above the fiscal year 2021 and $150 million above the President’s budget request.
  • Increased investments to revitalize low-income housing and distressed communities by doubling the Choice Neighborhoods Initiative to $400 million, an increase of $200 million above fiscal year 2021.
  • An increase in supportive services for HUD-assisted households to improve their connections to jobs, healthcare, and educational opportunities by providing $200 million for Self-Sufficiency Programs, an increase of $45 million above the fiscal year 2021.
  • Expanded housing options and improved living conditions for tribal communities by providing $950 million for Native American Programs, an increase of $125 million above fiscal year 2021 and an additional $4 million for the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program.
  • $10.6 billion for Community Planning and Development, an increase of $2.3 billion above fiscal year 2021, including $3.7 billion for Community Development Block Grants, an increase of $265 million above fiscal year 2021. This also includes $1.85 billion for the HOME Investment Partnerships Program which has helped preserve approximately 1.33 million affordable homes, an increase of $500 million above fiscal year 2021, and includes $50 million for a new down payment assistance program to help first-time, first-generation home buyers purchase a home.
  • More than 18,000 new housing options for people at risk of or experiencing harmlessness while also continuing assistance to over 750,000 people experiencing homelessness and more than 350,000 individuals in emergency shelters, by including $3.4 billion for Homeless Assistance Grants, an increase of $420 million above fiscal year 2021.
  • $14 billion for Project-based Rental Assistance to continue to house more than 1.2 million very low- and low-income households nationwide, an increase of $545 million above fiscal year 2021. An additional $1 billion is provided for Housing for the Elderly to build approximately 2,200 new affordable housing units for low-income seniors and $352 million for Housing for Persons with Disabilities to construct approximately 1,800 new affordable housing units for persons with disabilities.
  • $100 million for Housing Counseling assistance for renters, homeowners, and those considering homeownership and $185 million for Policy Development and Research, including $20 million to continue legal aid assistance for eviction prevention, a combined increase of $102.5 million above fiscal year 2021.
  • Increased enforcement in fair housing by providing $85 million for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity, an increase of $12 million above the fiscal year 2021 and equal to the President’s budget request.
  • $460 million for the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, an increase of $100 million above fiscal year 2021, including $60 million to conduct lead inspections in Section 8 voucher units to improve the health and condition of housing where nearly 229,000 children reside.
  • Community projects identified by more than 250 Members of Congress on both sides of the aisle to support a variety of targeted housing, economic, and community development investments.

Related Agencies—The bill provides $416.2 million for the related agencies in the bill, including $185 million for NeighborWorks to support unique solutions to expand affordable housing options, increase housing counseling assistance, and strengthen economic development. To strengthen the Federal coordination of assistance to people experiencing or at risk of homelessness, the bill includes $4 million for the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness.

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