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House to Consider Six-Bill Appropriations Minibus This Week

WASHINGTON — In advance of Floor consideration this week, the House Appropriations Committee released a division-by-division summary of the second minibus of fiscal year 2021 appropriations bills. The House is expected to consider the legislation, H.R. 7617, beginning this week.

The package includes six FY 2021 spending bills: Defense, Commerce-Justice-Science, Energy and Water Development, Financial Service and General Government, Labor-HHS-Education, and Transportation-Housing and Urban Development.

A division-by-division summary is below and available as a PDF here.

H.R. 7617
DIVISION-BY-DIVISION SUMMARY

H.R. 7617 totals $1.3 trillion in discretionary funding and consists of six FY 2021 appropriations bills: Defense, Commerce-Justice-Science, Energy and Water Development, Financial Service and General Government, Labor-HHS-Education, and Transportation-Housing and Urban Development. Chairwoman Lowey’s Manager’s Amendment would also add a new division to require the removal of certain offensive statutory from the United States Capitol.

In total, the package provides:

  • $658.8 billion in base defense funding;
  • $372 billion in base nondefense funding;
  • $68.4 billion for defense Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO);
  • $1.9 billion for nondefense program integrity initiatives;
  • $210 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations; and
  • $143 million for nondefense disaster relief activities.

Table of Contents

Defense
Commerce-Justice-Science
Energy and Water Development
Financial Service and General Government
Labor-HHS-Education
Transportation-Housing and Urban Development

Division A – Defense

Overview:

The Defense bill funds the Department of Defense, including operations and maintenance, readiness activities, research and development, equipment modernization, and health and quality-of-life programs for our troops and military families.

For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides $694.6 billion in new discretionary spending authority for the Department of Defense for functions under the Defense Subcommittee’s jurisdiction, an increase of $1.3 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level, and $3.7 billion below the President’s budget request. This includes $626.2 billion in base funding, an increase of $3.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level, and $3.5 billion below the President’s request. It also includes $68.4 billion for OCO/GWOT funding in title IX, a decrease of $2.2 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level, and $200 million below the President’s request.

Bill Summary:

Military Personnel

Total:                                      $162.3 billion

Base:                                       $157.7 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):           $4.6 billion

The FY 2021 Military Personnel recommendation is $157.7 billion in base funding for active, reserve and National Guard military personnel, a decrease of $1.2 billion below the budget request and an increase of $7.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level.

Operation and Maintenance

Total:                                      $254.5 billion

Base:                                      $196.7 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):          $57.8 billion

The FY 2021 Operation and Maintenance recommendation is $196.7 billion in base funding, an increase of $72.5 million above the budget request and a decrease of $2.7 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level.

Procurement

Total:                                      $140.1 billion

Base:                                       $133.6 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):           $6.5 billion

The FY 2021 Procurement recommendation is $133.6 billion in base funding, an increase of $2.8 billion above the budget request and a decrease of $0.2 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level.                                              

Aircraft

Shipbuilding

Vehicles/Force Protection

Other

Research, Development, Test and Evaluation

Total:                                      $104.6 billion

Base:                                      $104.3 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):           $0.3 billion

The FY 2021 RDT&E recommendation is $104.3 billion in base funding, a decrease of $1.9 billion below the budget request and a decrease of $0.1 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level.

Aircraft

Vehicles and Ground Forces

Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA)

Other

Revolving and Management Funds

Total:                                      $1.37 billion

Base Requirements:            $1.35 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):          $0.02 billion

The FY 2021 Revolving and Management Funds recommendation is $1.35 billion in base funding, equal to the budget request and a decrease of $210 million below the FY 2020 enacted level.

Other Department of Defense Programs

Total:                                      $35.7 billion

Base Requirements:            $35.3 billion

OCO/GWOT (title IX):          $0.4 billion

Defense Health Programs

Adds $512.5 million for cancer research.  The total amount is distributed as follows:

Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction

Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid

Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities

Office of the Inspector General

General Provisions

Afghanistan Security Forces Fund

Counter-ISIS Train and Equip Fund

Security Cooperation Programs

Congressional Oversight

Division B – Commerce-Justice-Science

Overview:

The Commerce-Justice-Science bill funds the Departments of Commerce and Justice, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Science Foundation (NSF), and other related agencies.

The legislation contains $71.473 billion in discretionary budget authority, a reduction of $1.7 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level, reflecting the completion of the 2020 Decennial Census.

The bill provides strong funding increases to help ensure civil rights and reform police practices throughout the country.  The bill also provides funding increases to help create jobs, fix the country’s infrastructure, support U.S. manufacturing, research and prepare for climate change, reduce gun violence, address the opioid crisis, and help keep schools safe. Furthermore, the bill provides funding increases for science research, science education, and legal services for underserved communities.

Bill Summary:

Department of Commerce – The bill includes $9.54 billion for the Commerce Department, a decrease of $5.68 billion below the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.2 billion above the President’s budget request. This includes funding for the following agencies.

Department of Justice (DOJ) – The bill funds DOJ at $33.2 billion, an increase of $972.5 million above the FY 2020 discretionary enacted level. These investments will strengthen protection for civil rights while sustaining Federal law enforcement efforts to thwart violent crime, fight human traffickers, and bring serious criminals to justice.  This includes funding for the following:

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) – $22.63 billion, equal to the FY 2020 enacted level. This funding includes continued investments in human space exploration efforts, as well as other investments, including the following:

Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) – $408.7 million, an increase of $19.2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $46.2 million above the Administration’s request.

Legal Services Corporation:  The legislation provides $465 million for the Legal Services Corporation, an increase of $25 million above the FY 2020 enacted level, to help increase the availability of legal assistance in underserved communities.

Policy Provisions –

Division C – Energy and Water Development

Overview:

The Energy and Water Development bill funds the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Interior programs, the Department of Energy, and other related agencies.

For fiscal year 2021, the legislation invests $49.6 billion in Energy and Water Development programs, an increase of $1.26 billion, or 3 percent, above the fiscal year 2020 enacted level. This funding will spur energy innovation that will create jobs and reinvigorate the economy while working to mitigate and adapt to climate change, improve the nation’s water infrastructure, and strengthen national security. The bill includes $23.1 billion for non-defense activities, $987 million below the fiscal year 2020 enacted level, and $26.5 billion for defense spending, an increase of $2.25 billion above the fiscal year 2020 enacted level.

To respond to the coronavirus pandemic and the ensuing economic recession, the bill provides an additional $43.5 billion in emergency spending. This funding builds and repairs water infrastructure projects and modernizes energy infrastructure for a clean energy future.

Bill Summary:

Army Corps of Engineers – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $7.63 billion, an increase of $1.7 billion above the President’s budget request.

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $17 billion in emergency funding to accelerate work on Corps projects around the country, putting Americans back to work and improving water infrastructure while reducing the current backlog. This includes:

Department of the Interior and Bureau of Reclamation – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $1.66 billion for the Department, an increase of $518 million above the President’s budget request.

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $3 billion in emergency funding to accelerate work on Department of the Interior and Bureau of Reclamation projects, putting Americans back to work and improving water infrastructure.

Department of Energy – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $41 billion for the Department, an increase of $2.3 billion above the FY 2020 level and $5.1 billion above the President’s budget request.

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $23.5 billion in emergency funding for the Department of Energy to modernize energy infrastructure for a clean energy future.

Independent Agencies

Policy Provision

Division D – Financial Service and General Government

Overview:

The Financial Service and General Government bill provides annual funding for the Department of the Treasury, the Judiciary, the Executive Office of the President, and other independent agencies, including the Small Business Administration. 

For fiscal year 2021, the bill includes $24.64 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $808 million over the 2020 enacted level. In addition, to respond to the coronavirus pandemic and the ensuing economic recession, the bill provides $61 billion for broadband infrastructure and $6 billion for the modernization of Federal buildings.

The Financial Services and General Government bill supports a broad range of functions and services in both the Executive and Judicial branches that are essential to the operation of the Federal Government. In addition, the bill supports programs that assist and protect the public, such as shielding consumers from defective and dangerous products, assisting small businesses, investing in distressed communities, and ensuring the integrity of Federal elections. The bill includes significant funding increases to support these critical functions.

Bill Summary:

Department of the Treasury – For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $13.66 billion in discretionary appropriations for the Department, an increase of $601.4 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. The bill does not include the proposed transfer of the United States Secret Service from the Department of Homeland Security to the Department of the Treasury. Of the total provided for the Department of the Treasury, the bill includes:

Executive Office of the President – The bill includes a total of $741.2 million, an increase of $14.2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $387.8 million above the President’s budget request.

The Judiciary – The bill includes a total of $7.8 billion in discretionary appropriations, an increase of $287 million above the FY 2020 enacted level. 

Additionally, the bill extends temporary judgeships in several districts.

District of Columbia – The bill includes a total of $762.1 million, an increase of $47.8 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $8.8 million above the President’s budget request.

In addition, the bill removes objectionable policy riders previously carried that intrude on home rule in the District of Columbia:

The bill also restricts the President’s ability to federalize the District of Columbia Metropolitan Police Department.

Independent Agencies:

Policy Provisions –

Border Wall – Includes a provision to prohibit the use of funds from the Treasury Forfeiture Fund for the construction of the President’s border wall.

Division F – Labor-HHS-Education

Overview:

The Labor-HHS-Education bill includes funding for programs within the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and other related agencies, including the Social Security Administration.

The LHHS bill supports some of the nation’s most critical programs that touch individuals and families throughout their lifespan, from Early Head Start to Social Security. The bill continues to invest in programs that provide opportunities for millions of families, so that every individual has a better chance at a better life – with a good education, a good job, and access to affordable health care.

For fiscal year 2021, the draft bill includes $196.5 billion in overall funding, an increase of $2.4 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $20.8 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request after accounting for offsets and adjustments.

In addition, to rebuild this nation’s aged public health infrastructure, the bill provides $24.425 billion in emergency spending. This funding will support State and local public health departments, public health laboratories, and global health activities, which is critical to national resilience from this and future public health threats. The bill also includes contingency funding to help States meet unanticipated unemployment insurance workloads.

Bill Summary:

Department of Labor (DOL) – The bill provides a total of $12.7 billion in discretionary appropriations for DOL, an increase of $254 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $1.6 billion above the President’s budget request.  Of this amount, the bill includes:

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) – The bill provides a total of $96.4 billion for HHS, an increase of $1.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $11.1 billion above the President’s budget request.

In addition, the bill includes $9 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations for CDC to improve the nation’s preparedness for public health emergencies.

The bill includes $9 billion in emergency supplemental funding for the following public health and emergency response activities:

The bill also directs CMS to use $100 million in carryover funds from ACA user fees to support the ACA Navigators program, as well as outreach, enrollment, and advertising during the ACA open enrollment period.

In addition, the bill includes $4.5 billion in emergency supplemental appropriations for BARDA to support advanced research and development and advanced manufacturing of vaccines and therapeutics to improve the nation’s preparedness for public health emergencies.

The bill includes emergency supplemental funding to support advanced research, development, manufacturing, production, and purchase of vaccines and therapeutics; enhancements to domestic vaccine production facilities; and innovation in antibacterial research and development:

Public Health Emergency Fund – The bill provides $5 billion to deposit in a permanent emergency fund to ensure the Department of Health and Human Services is able to respond quickly and aggressively to a broad range of public health threats and protect the American people.

Department of Education (ED) – The bill provides a total of $73.5 billion in discretionary appropriations for ED, an increase of $716 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $6.9 billion above the President’s budget request. Of this amount, the bill includes:

Related Agencies –

Policy Provisions

Bolstering Pandemic Response

Supporting Affordable Health Care

Protecting Migrants

Defending Reproductive Health Care

Protecting Workers Rights

Protecting Civil Rights

Expanding Opportunity and Ensuring Accountability in Education

Supporting People with Disabilities

Helping Reduce Injection-Related Infections to Save Lives

Division G – Transportation-Housing and Urban Development

Overview:

The Transportation-Housing and Urban Development bill funds the Department of Transportation, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and other related agencies, including the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness.

For fiscal year 2021, the legislation provides $158.3 billion in base budgetary resources. The bill includes $75.9 billion in discretionary funding, an increase of $1.7 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $16.8 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request. Consistent with the INVEST in America Act, the bill includes budgetary resources for surface transportation programs totaling $78.7 billion. In addition, the legislation provides $75 billion to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic by investing in our nation’s transportation and housing infrastructure.

Bill Summary:

Department of Transportation (DOT)— For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $107.2 billion in total budgetary resources for DOT – an increase of $21.1 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $19.4 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request.  Of this amount, the bill includes:

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $26 billion for the Department of Transportation programs to strengthen and make more resilient our nation’s aging infrastructure, including:

Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)— For fiscal year 2021, the bill provides a total of $50.6 billion for HUD – an increase of $1.5 billion above the FY 2020 enacted level and $13.3 billion above the President’s 2021 budget request.  FHA and GNMA receipts for FY 2021 are $10.7 billion, $3.3 billion more than in the FY 2020 enacted bill.  Of the $50.6 billion, the bill includes:

In addition, to support the economic recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $49 billion for the Department of Housing and Urban Development programs to bolster communities nationwide by making robust and resilient investments in public housing, affordable housing, and community development, including:

Related Agencies—The bill provides $432.2 million for the related agencies in the bill, an increase of $62.2 million above the FY 2020 enacted level and $184 million above the President’s 2021 budget request.

In addition, to support recovery from the coronavirus pandemic, the bill provides an additional $300 million for the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation (NeighborWorks) to spur economic stabilization and investment in communities.
 

Policy Provisions

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