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Diversity Lags at Top of U.S. Spy Agencies

Diversity Lags at Top of U.S. Spy Agencies

For years, U.S. spy agencies have acknowledged they need a more diverse workforce to help understand increasingly complex threats and interpret foreign cultures.They are making progress toward that goal—except at the top.

 

Years of studies, recommendations and promises have had limited impact on reshaping the upper echelons of the U.S. intelligence community, comprising 17 civilian and military agencies and offices, according to current and former officials and workforce statistics.

 

 

 

Diversity Lags at Top of U.S. Spy Agencies

 

Sept. 18, 2020

By Warren Strobel, Wall Street Journal

 

For years, U.S. spy agencies have acknowledged they need a more diverse workforce to help understand increasingly complex threats and interpret foreign cultures. They are making progress toward that goal—except at the top.

 

Years of studies, recommendations and promises have had limited impact on reshaping the upper echelons of the U.S. intelligence community, comprising 17 civilian and military agencies and offices, according to current and former officials and workforce statistics.

 

Particularly at the top, spy agencies remain less diverse than the country they are designed to protect, or even the federal workforce writ large.

 

Read the full article on the Wall Street Journal Website.

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